“But I Did It”- Guilt in Captain America: Civil War

I came away from Civil War really struck by how overwhelming the theme of guilt was. It motivates people to do selfless things, it motivates people to do selfish things, and it’s the driving force behind the ultimate showdown between Bucky and Tony. What the movie does though is contrast the fashion people deal with their guilt.
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Bucky Barnes: The Commodity, The Emasculated, The Subaltern

The critically acclaimed movie, Captain America: The Winter Soldier, offers a new look at the character of Bucky Barnes and his more antagonistic alias, the Winter Soldier. The hegemony depicts Barnes and his alias to be the main villain working against the patriotic hero and his gang of superheroes in the film however, this is not true. In fact through the lens of Marxism, feminism, and postcolonial theory, it can be said that Bucky Barnes as the Winter Soldier is the victim rather than the villain due to his commodification, emasculation, and colonized self at the hands of Hydra, thus causing him to become a subaltern figure throughout the film. … More Bucky Barnes: The Commodity, The Emasculated, The Subaltern

POETIC TRAGEDY IN THE WINTER SOLDIER

In Poetics, Aristotle describes the forms of tragic poetry, and what makes for the most compelling characters and stories. Tragedy, he says, takes four forms – complex, suffering, character and spectacle. Combined, these create the best kind of story. Captain America: The Winter Soldier (2014) can be considered a tragedy of all four kinds. As a narrative it also follows Aristotle’s specifications for proper organization and subject. Following the tragic character of Bucky Barnes, the Winter Soldier, the film evokes the “pity and fear” that are the core of good tragedy. … More POETIC TRAGEDY IN THE WINTER SOLDIER

Steve Rogers, Depression, And Suicidal Tendencies

The basic problem I have is the assertion that Steve Rogers cannot possibly be suicidal, and that his act of laying down his shield at the end of the helicarrier fight is an act of hope and that his trauma muddied up the waters, transforming happiness into a question rather than something that lives within him. Which just? No? There are so many problems with that, even aside from the wording which, probably unintentionally, trivializes the trauma he’s been through. … More Steve Rogers, Depression, And Suicidal Tendencies

Pain, Personhood, and Parity: The Depiction of Bucky Barnes in the Marvel Cinematic Universe

There has been a lot of commentary written about the Winter Soldier/Bucky Barnes (1) in the month since the film was released in the US, and much of it has characterized his actions as those of a dog or an animal, but I believe that what he really is is a child caught in the formative stages of personality development. … More Pain, Personhood, and Parity: The Depiction of Bucky Barnes in the Marvel Cinematic Universe

Bucky, Brubaker, and Manpain

The substance of manpain is that a man is unable to be successful at being a Man (unable to protect his people, unable to succeed sexually, unable to dominate, etc) and responds by asserting his masculinity through alternative routes (such as… riding off on a motorcycle into the rainy night, probably carrying an automatic rifle and shedding a single tear). And that is the nature of what happens to Bucky. … More Bucky, Brubaker, and Manpain

On Bucky and trauma

I love the MCU fandom, but there is a goodly portion of it that does not understand PTSD and trauma at all. They’re swimming around in this fandom about as aware of the workings of trauma as fish in the ocean are of the current international political climate, which is to say, not at all.

You can see this most obviously in the way some people write Bucky. He’s such a prime example that I’ll focus on him. … More On Bucky and trauma